Den Haag Leeghwaterplein and Van der Kunststraat

Den Haag Leeghwaterplein
26 December 2017


HTM Avenio Tram 11 to Scheveningen Haven / Strand

Van der Kunststraat
26 December 2017


Foundations of Mandir / Mandir under construction / Gurdwara


I heard that these are the foundations for a ISKCON mandir, which might not be built


This mandir (under construction) is meant to be a Hindoestani (Surinam) place of worship, but there is/was a conflict in the community, which caused delay


Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha
1e Van der Kunstraat 79-81
2521 BY Den Haag

I have no problem with a gurdwara next to Hindu mandirs, but there was quite a bit of unfortunate publicity about it, which was not sufficiently countermanded by the Gurdwara.

The local radio / tv organisation published on its site :  
Groot hindoetempelpark
Clubbing the Gurdwara together with the mandirs as Hindoe tempels

Man in Blue

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Den Haag: Mosque – Hobbemaplein – Haagse Markt

Moskee/Hobbemaplein/Haagse Markt
24 December 2017


Mosque (Masjid) – Van der Vennestraat


Haagse Markt – Avenio Tram 11 to Scheveningen


Hobbemaplein – Avenio Tram 11 to Scheveningen


Hobbemaplein – Tram 6 to Leyenburg


Hobbemaplein – Avenio Tram 11 to Leeghwaterplein

To see all my pictures:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12445197@N05/

More Netherlands pictures to be published
Harjinder Singh
Man in Blue

The Hindu – The Hindu – ‘Unforgivable’: Editorial on 7 December 1992, on the Babri Masjid demolition

Op/Ed, 6 December 2017. It was religious fanaticism at its ugliest in Ayodhya yesterday, with the country’s worst fears coming true in the nightmarish spectacle of the brutal destruction of the 450 year old Babri Masjid by thousands of frenzied kar sevaks.

The disputed mosque was razed to the ground with a barbaric savagery reminiscent of the crude traditions of settling scores in medieval history. The demolition of the Masjid has delivered a lethal blow to the image of a secular and democratic India.

Yesterday’s catastrophe underlines the validity of the misgivings that a permissive attitude to the kar seva would have disastrous consequences. Sunday was a dark day for India. The Hindu shares the nation’s sense of deep anguish at this painful moment.

The BJP Government in Uttar Pradesh has forfeited its right to rule in the State by its brazen and shameless abdication of its constitutional responsibility.

Its assurances to the Centre that it would not violate the court order and that it would discharge its constitutional obligations proved insincere as it appeared to actively collude with the savage and destructive attitude of the kar sevaks surging forward to capture the disputed structure.

The State police, completely outnumbered by crowds of trishul-wielding kar sevaks, withdrew from the site as the unruly mob charged into the complex.

For the better part of the day, the inaction of the State police force coupled with the refusal of the district magistrate to permit the Central forces to act implied that the State Government endorsed the mosque’s wanton destruction.

The Central forces had to fight their way in, even as they were prevented by the State troops from bursting teargas shells to disperse the crowd.

The barricades that the State authorities had put up to guard the disputed structure were hopelessly inadequate, making a mockery of the State Government’s claim that it would take all steps to protect the disputed structure.

The resignation of the Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister, Mr Kalyan Singh does not absolve his Government or the BJP of culpability for the kar seva’s sordid conclusion.

The BJP and its militant allies, the RSS, the VHP and the Bajrang Dal stand exposed as having brought on this horrific denouement even as the essentially destructive and fascist nature of its strategy and tactics cannot be in doubt any more. The BJP’s claim to be a defender of the national interest lies in shreds today.

Much as Mr L K Advani and his colleagues would like to disown the savagery of Sunday, they cannot escape the responsibility for having whipped up passions to the extent that it reflected in the blind mob hysteria which culminated in the attack on the Babri Masjid.

The shrill tenor of the Hindutva campaign, the continual jibes at “pseudo secular policies”, the inflammatory propaganda that minorities are being appeased all served to present a dangerous and false picture of Indian social reality to the public, breeding the sort of ugly fanaticism that surfaced in Ayodhya yesterday.

The Narasimha Rao administration will face the criticism that it did not adequately forestall Sunday’s development. In retrospect, it was a mistake to have put any faith in the sincerity of the Uttar Pradesh Government’s assurances that it would uphold the rule of law.

Thereby, the Centre had jeopardised the safety of the Babri Masjid. The Government should not have taken this risk, given that the disputed mosque had come to be a symbol of the fate of India’s commitment to secularism.

This administration had in fact been fortified by support from the non-BJP opposition parties which had promised to endorse any strong action in defence of the integrity of the disputed structure. Yet the Narasimha Rao Government hesitated in seizing the initiative in ensuring the mosque’s safety.

The wisdom of this Government’s strategic approach to the Ayodhya issue will be sharply questioned in the days to come, within the ruling party and outside.

But what is vital is to recognise that this is a defining moment in India’s history, a moment at which the country can be plunged into a dark abyss of primitive emotions threatening to erase four decades of a successful track record of a progressive secular democracy.

All the secular political forces must rally to the defence of the country and pull it back from the brink. A first step would be to rebuild the destroyed Babri Masjid as a gesture towards the minority community and as a reaffirmation of an unwavering commitment to the vision of a democratic India, free of any kind of bigotry.

This Editorial has been republished on the occasion of the anniversary of the Babri Masjid demolition on 6 December 2017. The original Editorial was published by The Hindu on 7 December 1992.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/unforgivable-editorial-on-the-babri-masjid-demolition-published-by-the-hindu-on-december-7-1992/article21272508.ece

The Statesman – Mandir will be built when Lord Rama wants it, PM Modi will not build it: Sibal

New Delhi, 7 December 2017. Senior Congress leader Kapil Sibal on Wednesday in a dig at Prime Minister Narendra Modi said that Ram Mandir will be built “when Lord Rama wants it and Modi will not build the temple”.

“As far as Ram Mandir is concerned (Modiji), it will be built when Lord Ram wants it to be built,” said Sibal.

“We believe in the Lord, we don’t believe in you (Modiji). You are not going to build that temple..If you think that you are, then you are mistaken…

“It’s when God wants it. When Lord Ram wants it the temple will be built wherever, whenever. And that the court will decide,” Sibal added.

Sibal had in the apex court said that the Ram Janambhoomi-Babri Masjid dispute should be heard after the 2019 general elections, which triggered a major political storm.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi attacked the Congress and congratulated the Sunni Waqf Board for distancing itself from Sibal’s plea.

However, Sibal clarified that he did not represent the Sunni Waqf Board, but one of the individuals in the case.

“Our PM comments without knowing things sometimes. Amit Shah and the Prime Minister said I represented Sunni Waqf Board. I was never a Sunni Waqf Board lawyer. I can understand your President (Shah) saying such a thing because I don’t expect anything better from him.

“The PM did not check the fact that actually I never represented the Sunni Waqf Board in the Supreme Court and yet he thanked them. I request the PM to be a little more careful before making such public comments. It doesn’t behove the status of a Prime Minister.”

http://www.thestatesman.com/india/mandir-will-built-lord-rama-wants-pm-modi-will-not-build-sibal-1502540710.html

Oostende NMBS station – Brussel Sint-Goedele and Koningstraat

Oostende NMBS station
7 November 2017

The west (Oostende) east (Eupen) connection
Visiting all four components of the Belgian Federation

Brussel Sint-Goedele
8 November 2017


Sint-Goedele Cathedral
Near Brussel Centraal

Koningstraat MIVB Trams
8 November 2017

MIVB Tram 93 to Legrand

MIVB Tram 93 to Legrand

MIVB Tram 93 to Stadion

To see all my pictures:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12445197@N05/

More Belgian pictures to be published
Harjinder Singh
Man in Blue

Oostende – West Vlaanderen

Oostende
Plakkerstraat and tower
7 November 2017

Shri Guru Ravidass Bhawan
Plakkersstraat, Oostende
Not open daily like the Gent Gurdwara


Shri Guru Ravidass Bhawan
Plakkersstraat, Oostende

All I know about this tower is that it is nearer to the station than to the Ravidas Bhawan

Oostende
De Lijn Trams
7 November 2017

De Lijn Tram to De Panne
This tram line  is about 75 km long and runs from near the border with the Netherlands to near the border with France

Southbound ‘Kusttram’ to De Panne

To see all my pictures:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12445197@N05/

More Belgian pictures to be published
Harjinder Singh
Man in Blue

The Hindu – What is the Babri Masjid case all about?

Krishnadas Rajagopal

2 December 2017.

What is it?

At the core of the nearly 70-year-old Ramjanmabhoomi-Babri Masjid dispute is the belief that Lord Ram was born 9,00,000 years ago in the Treta Yuga, in a room located under what was the central dome of the Babri Masjid.

The masjid was built on the orders of Mughal emperor Babur in the 16th century and had occupied 1,482.5 square yards before its demolition by kar sevaks on 6 December 1992.

On September 30, 2010, a three-judge Lucknow Bench of the Allahabad High Court upheld the Hindu belief, reasoning that the “world knows” where Ram’s birthplace is. The Bench ordered a partition of the site occupied by the Babri Masjid equally among the UP Sunni Central Waqf Board, Nirmohi Akhara and Ram Lalla, the deity.

In May 2011, on appeals by the Sunni Waqf Board and other parties, the Supreme Court stayed the judgment, calling it a “leap of faith.” The stay ensured status quo, which meant that a lone priest would continue to worship in the makeshift temple built at the site, a custom legitimised in the Ayodhya Act of 1993.

The ban continued on any mode of activity on the 67 acres acquired by the Centre following the Supreme Court orders of March 13 and 14, 2002. Now, the appeals are due for hearing before a Bench led by Chief Justice of India Dipak Misra on December 5.

The hearing coincides with the eve of the 25th anniversary of the Babri Masjid demolition. The case banks mostly on documents written in languages as varied as Persian and Arabic, dating back to the 16th century.

How did it come about?

The idols of Ram Lalla were placed “surreptitiously” under the central dome of the Babri Masjid in 1949. The next year, Gopal Simla Visharad filed the first suit in the Faizabad civil court for rights to perform puja to Ram Lalla.
Paramahansa Ramachandra Das filed a suit for continuation of puja and keeping idols in the structure.

In 1959, Nirmohi Akhara filed a third suit, seeking a direction to hand over charge of the disputed site. The UP Sunni Central Wakf Board filed the fourth suit in 1961 for declaration and possession and a fifth was filed in 1989 in the name of Ram Lalla Virajman for declaration and possession.

In 1986, the district court ordered locks to be removed for the site to be opened for Hindu worshippers. In 1991, the Uttar Pradesh government acquired land around the structure for the convenience of devotees coming for Ram Lalla darshan.

In 1993, the Centre took over 67 acres of land around the area and sought the Supreme Court’s opinion on whether there existed a Hindu place of worship before the structure was built. In 1994, the litigation reached the Lucknow Bench. The suits were heard from 1996 till September 2010.

Why does it matter?

The Supreme Court’s decision will be a deciding factor in the backdrop of the movement for building a Ram temple at the disputed site gaining momentum. The Ram temple was a major promise in the BJP manifesto.

Meanwhile, the Supreme Court, in April 2017, decided to revive the criminal conspiracy charges against senior BJP leaders, including L K Advani, Murli Manohar Joshi and Uma Bharti, in the Babri Masjid demolition cases.

What next?

With just days left for the Supreme Court to hear the appeals on December 5, UP Central Shia Waqf Board chairman Syed Waseem Rizvi informed the court about a settlement reached between the Board and “non-Muslim stakeholders” for the building of the Ram temple at the disputed site.

The Board said it would bear the expenses and construct a mosque in Lucknow. Rizvi had earlier claimed the Babri Masjid was a Shia waqf (endowment), and termed the Sunnis, who had been at the frontlines of the title dispute, as “hardliners.”

The so-called settlement may face resistance from the Sunni faction in court. Though the Supreme Court has leaned in favour of an out-of-court settlement, this Sunni-Shia rift may compel it to adjudicate the dispute.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/the-hindu-explains-the-babri-masjid-case/article21248813.ece

Gent: Sint-Macharius – Sint-Baafs & De Krook

Sint-Macharius – Sint-Baafs
17 October

Sint-Machariuskerk


Sint Baafs Abdij (Abbey)

Sint-Machariusstraat

Sint-Machariuskerk

De Krook
18 October 2017

Belfort tower seen from De Krook Library

To see all my pictures:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12445197@N05/

More Belgian pictures to be published
Harjinder Singh
Man in Blue

Gent: Visserijvaart – Sint-Macharius – Sint-Baafs

Visserijvaart
17 October 2017

Visserijvaart

Sint-Macharius – Sint-Baafs
17 October 2017

Ferdinand Lousbergskaai – Sint-Machariuspoort

Sint-Machariuspoort – Herberg Macharius

Sint-Machariuskerk

Sint-Baafs Abdij

To see all my pictures:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12445197@N05/

More Belgian pictures to be published
Harjinder Singh
Man in Blue

Bloemekenswijk – Profundo programme

Bloemekenswijk
Profundo programme
Moskee Tevhid Camii
09 October 2017

Frank, his hat and Mr Ali

Chairman of the Mosque, Margot, Frank and I had our lunch in the Tevhid Camii Mosque


Mr Ali, Frank, his hat, Margot and the Mosque chairman

Bloemekenswijk
Francisco Ferrerlaan
09 October 2017


Tram 1 to Flanders Expo via Sint-Pieters


Tram 1 to Flanders Expo via Sint-Pieters


Tram 1 to Wondelgem

To see all my pictures:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12445197@N05/

More Belgian pictures to be published
Harjinder Singh
Man in Blue